gardenerscardiff.co.uk

For the Best Gardeners in the Cardiff Area

   Apr 29

Your Questions About Gardening

Paul asks…

whart is the best and cheapest way to start a website, blog about a topic, and get traffic?

and blog about a topic you know about, and get traffic and hopefully a nice adsense check?

GardenersCardiff answers:

All you need to do is choose a topic which interests you, check that your niche is one in which there is money to be made and then write articles about that subject for your blog while monetizing your blog with affiliate programs related to your niche. You can also earn extra income by placing Google adsense ads on your blog. Your blog could be about gardening, travel, crafts, pets – almost any topic which interests you has the potential to earn money from a niche subject within that topic. There is a free report at the link below, which explains what blogging is, what a niche blog is and how you can earn money just by writing about a topic which interests you.

Ruth asks…

Do you know a good name for a Garden Blog?

I am starting my first garden blog focussing on the bullets below. Can you come up with an interesting title/name? Be creative, the bullets are just to give an idea, and that it’s not a regular veggie blog.

I have a brain cloud. Thanks much!

-Medusa
-Exotic
-Tropical
-Unusual
-Rare
-Fruit
-Texas
-Jam

GardenersCardiff answers:

Dig This!

Think Dirty

Growing Pains

Michael asks…

how do i start my greenhouse garden?

I have an empty “nature harvest” 6×8 greenhouse in my 2 car garage(the garage does not drop below 50 degrees in the winter.) I have a heater in the greenhouse that keeps the temperature around 70-78 degrees at all times. i plan on growing carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, peppers, various herbs and various flowers. first i need to learn how to “start” my seeds, second what and when i need to grow them, and third how to sustain a year round indoor greenhouse. If anyone knows some helpful websites, blogs, videos, or has any common knowledge about running a greenhouse would be greatly appreciated.
it is mid December and i have no lighting for the greenhouse yet. any suggested lighting/ shelving i should use?

GardenersCardiff answers:

Personally I would save the greenhouse for out of doors in the spring, which will greatly prolong your outdoor growing season.
For growing stuff indoors, take a look at Amazon, for example, and look at florescent grow light fixtures with broad spectrum bulbs. You can get inexpensive, energy efficient systems starting at $50 that you can hang in your shed for winter gardening, that should last you for many years. Also, go on seed catalogue sites, like Veseys Seeds, you can see some really neat indoor growing systems there and decide if one of those would suit you better.
Many of the veggies like your cauliflower, broccoli, brussel sprouts, lettuces and greens, like cooler weather and will die off in too much heat. So other than making sure that it is warm enough for them to germinate, which isn’t much, what they need is 6-8 hours of daylight to actually grow.
Things like peppers, and some herbs do require heat and minimum 8-10 hours of daylight to survive and produce flowers and set fruit.
Many of your vegetables are best directly sewn right where they are going to grow. They will take care of their own sprouting. This is stuff like your lettuces, mescluns, cabbages, cauliflower, broccoli, mustard and asian greens etc. Plant, water, and keep an eye on them. They will do their own thing.
Things like peppers, tomatoes, and egg plants like to be nice and warm to sprout, and need to stay warm to grow. What we do is take a plastic container, fold a piece of paper towel to fit the bottom, and put your pepper seeds for example, inside a fold of the paper towel. Wet the paper towel with warm water, put the lid on, and put it up on a warm, dark shelf for a couple of days. When you check them, you can see which seeds are good by which ones are sprouting. Plant them in starter pots and keep them where it is warm and light. Transplant to bigger pots when they get their second set of true leaves. They will need the root space. This is where you will really want a good growing system as these kinds of plants are a little more demanding than the cool-weather ones.
Having good soil is essential to growing anything, whether it is in pots or out in a vegetable patch or green house. I will post my link on good soil and what to look for.
I plant my cool weather vegetables in the greenhouse often as early as Febuary if the ground is not frozen in there, and we are often eating out of the greenhouse in March. Once the days get longer and hotter in April/May, though, all those cool weather veggies are about done with the heat (they wilt and die, or bolt (send up seed stalks) and become really bitter. That is the signal to plant new greens outside for the next couple of months. Your tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers, etc that like the heat, should be started indoors 6-8 weeks before the last frost, if they are going into an outdoor greenhouse. So when your days start being warm, and greenhouse temps start hitting 20 degrees and up, you can take your hothouse veggies out to the greehouse through the day for sun and to get them used to being out there. Plants can go through climate change by the way. Bring them in at night until the nights are warm and your plants wont go into shock and die out there from cold. Then you transplant them into the greenhouse and leave them there.
If you are going to do all this in the garage, your biggest thing is going to be making sure you have enough daylight from your grow lights, and heat for the plants that need it.
Good luck, I hope that helps :)

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